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Swimming in noise

Photo credit: Christian Gloor licensed under CC BY 2.0 by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition This delightful article in Nautilus discusses underwater acoustics, anthropogenic noise in the ocean, and its effect on marine life. It’s too wide ranging for me to summarize in a few sentences, but I highly recommend that you read it

The ocean is not a quiet place

Photo credit: Trygve Finkelsen by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition This report by PhD candidate Thomas Uboldi, University of Quebec at Rimouski, on Phys.org discusses noise pollution in the world’s oceans. Uboldi notes that many still think oceans are quiet, based on Jaques Cousteau’s 1953 book and 1956 documentary, both with the titleThe

The quietest place I have ever been

Photo credit: Frédéric SALEIN licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition I recently wrote about a nighttime noise measurement just under 30 A-weighted decibels (dBA)* in the Huab Reserve in Namibia, but I can now report an even quieter nighttime noise measurement: Only 28.3 dBA average sound pressure level, on

The ground is surprisingly noisy

Photo credit: Chris Waits licensed under CC BY 2.0 by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition BBC Future, republishing an article from Knowable Magazine, reports on research about underground noise, not that made by subway trains or utility pipes, but natural underground noise made by insects, small mammals, and plant roots. The developing field of

Nature is still quiet

Photo credit: Darius Krause from Pexels by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition The National Park Service noise maps show that without anthropogenic noise, nature is quiet. I have measured nighttime noise levels just above or just below 30 dBA in remote parts of Wales, the French Alps, and Sri Lanka. I was in

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