Turtles can suffer hearing loss, too

Photo credit: Jolo Diaz by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition This report in Science Daily discussing research at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution states that marine noise pollution can cause temporary hearing loss in turtles. This phenomenon was known for fish and marine mammals, but had not previously been reported in reptiles. Like

Noise criteria for marine mammals?

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition I am familiar with occupational noise exposure criteria and noise but had never heard of noise exposure criteria for marine mammals. We know about the dangers of ocean noise for marine mammals and fishes, and have written several blog posts about this. Now, a large group of scientific

Noise bugs bugs

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition I’m cleaning up my study and came across last summer’s issue of Acoustics Today, which had a fascinating article by Maggie Raboin, a PhD candidate at the University of California, Berkeley, with the somewhat dry title “Inaudible Noise Pollution of the Invertebrate World.” I think a catchier

Noise bothers narwhals in the Arctic

This image is in the public domain by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition This report on EuroNews Green discusses research on narwhals done by scientists at the University of Copenhagen and the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources. The scientists studied these unique marine mammals, recognizable by their hypertrophied incisor that looks like a

Noise is bad for narwhals

Photo credit: Dr. Daniel Fink by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition The narwhal is a remarkable animal, a small whale with a single tusk, which is actually a hypertrophied tooth that can grow to ten feet long. Unlike the unicorn, the narwhal is real. As described in this article in Maclean’s magazine, a

Why whales in Alaska are happy

Photo credit: Christopher Michel licensed under CC BY 2.0 by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition This report from BBC News explains why whales in Alaska have been happy. Namely, the coronavirus pandemic shut down tourism, quieting the waters in which they live, and making it easier for them to communicate. Whales are social

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